Play Dough Recipes

Stretchy Dough 

  • 3lb self-raising flour
  • approx. 1 and a quarter pints of water

Mix together until dough is formed. Knead well.

Makes an elastic dough that the children will enjoy pulling and stretching.

Will not keep for any length of time though.

http://childmindinghelp.co.uk/freeresources/PSE/stretchydough.html

Giltter Play Dough

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • Food coloring gel
  • Glitter

Mix all ingredients with the exception of the glitter in a sauce pan. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture forms a ball (sounds cryptic, but you will know when it happens). Remove from heat, but dough ball in a large bowl. Add the glitter and knead until smooth and uniform. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.

http://nanasfablife.blogspot.com/2011/07/lily-and-chloes-fabulous-life-glitter.html

Microwave Play Dough

Don’t want to cook your playdough on the stove? Use a microwave!

  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 cup of flour
  • 2 teaspoon of cream of tartar
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking oil
  • 1/2 cup of salt
  • Food coloring

Mix all of the ingredients, except for the food color. Microwave it for about one minute and stir. Cook for about 30 more seconds. Keep repeating until the playdough is dough-ish. Knead the playdough and place the food coloring in. Its that simple!

http://www.playdoughrecipe.com/microwave-playdough-recipe/

Cooked Play Dough

  • 2 cups of plain flour
  • 1 Tbsp. of cooking oil
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 2 cups of coloured water
  • 1 cup of salt

Place all of the ingredients in a medium size or large pan. Cook slowly on medium-high and stir it until the playdough thickens. Keeps best in the fridge in plastic containers.
Takes less than 10 minutes.

http://www.playdoughrecipe.com/cooked-playdough-recipe/

Modelling Dough

There are many types of modelling dough that you can buy, but it is just as easy (and much cheaper) to make your  own.  Use food colourings for different colours and you can make it seasonal by adding glitter near Christmas (or to make fairy dough), smooth pebbles in summer etc just use your imagination!

Essential Oils
Used sparingly these make great additions to modelling dough  – a few drops of lavender can have a calming effect (and is antibacterial) and eucalyptus has a great menthol smell which is great for winter (not suitable for use around asthma sufferers).

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 4 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons oil
  • 1/2 cup cream of tartar

Mix all ingredients in a sauce pan. Cook and stir over low/medium heat until play dough is completely formed and no longer sticky. Allow to cool slightly before storing in an air tight container or bag.  Keep in the fridge.

Uncooked modelling dough

  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 cup salt
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • food coloring
  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons cornflour

Put everything except the flour and cornflour into a bowl.  Gradually add these until you have the consistency of bread dough.  Store in an air tight container or bag in the fridge.

Salt dough

  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup flour plus additional flour

Mix all ingredient together in a saucepan over a low heat.  Remove when rubbery.  Once cooled knead with flour to make it workable.  This is a great dough for making Christmas decorations and models out of.  Once made pop them on grease proof paper or a tray on a radiator (or in airing cupboard or bottom shelf of a rayburn) so that they dry very slowly. Once dryed they can be painted.

Fairy dough – just add glitter (great when you are getting festive too)

http://www.netmums.com/activities/arts-and-crafts/modelling-dough

Lily Pad’s Play Dough

  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil
  • 4 tsp cream tartar
  • Food colouring
  • To make smelly play dough, simply add an
  • essence (vanilla or peppermint).

Mix together ingredients in a sauce pan
Heat for a few minutes on the hob, stirringcontinuously
Remove from heat when the consistency is a doughy texture
Leave to cool before use

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/lily_pads_-_play_dough_download.pdf

Related Posts

Musical Shakers

Babies – Treasure Baskets

Frugal Ideas: Clothing

NCT Nearly New Sales

Autumn and Spring are the best times to find an NCT nearly new sale. There are many in the area and if you are an NCT member you will be allowed entry into the sale before other consumers. Be warned though, they are a bit of a bun fight.

Table Top Sales in your area

The best way to find out about local table top sales are to look in the Gazette, The Observor (local papers) or read your local community leaflet or magazine. If you live near a Community Hall you can also keep a look out for posters advertising any local sales

Freegle

Freegle not only allows you to offer your items for good, but it also allows you to request items. If you place a post with “Wanted” at the beginning an email will be sent out to the community and anyone who has your items available for offer will be able to email you directly.

Cheapcycle

This is along the same lines as Freegle but all items are priced for under £50.

Gumtree

Very similar to Cheapcycle but also includes bigger ticket items

Store Sales

If you sign up to many of the larger chain stores they will often email you dates of sales and discount codes.
Festival Place has the following places selling baby and children clothes (please let me know if I’ve missed any!):

Mama’s and Papa’s
Pumpkin Patch
Next
M&S
Boots
H&M
Monsoon
New Look
Primark

Supermarket Sales

Many of the big supermarket chains have great clothing ranges that are very reasonably priced. Sainsburys and Asda seem to do baby clothes that are bigger in sizes and therefore last longer.

Little Pickles Markets

These tend to be in South Hampshire and the closest event is in Winchester.

Baby and Children Markets

There is a franchise who operates in Tadley and across Basingstoke. Keep an eye on the website for future events.

Are there any other frugal clothing ideas for babies and children that you can think of?

Musical Shakers

Miss NHM and I made a shaker at a baby PEEP class that we visited out in Kingsclere when Miss NHM was 7 months old.

We still have her shaker now, at 3 1/2 years old and she still plays with it!

What you will need

  • ·      1 plastic cup
  • ·      Dried rice or lentils
  • ·      Paper
  • ·      Sellotape
  • ·      Pens, stickers or paints to decorate

Steps to making a shaker

  • ·      Fill your chosen container with lentils or rice
  • ·      Cover the top of the cup with paper and secure with sellotape
  • ·      Decorate the shaker using a range  of pens and paints or other  decorative material

Tips for staying safe …

  • ·      Young children must be supervised at all times.
  • ·       Do not allow your child to ingest the rice or lentils (risk of choking)
  • ·       Do not use ceramic cups

Working together

  • ·      Enhance your child’s communication by asking what they are doing with each stage
  • ·      Ask your child about the colours and shapes they are using to decorate their shaker.
  • ·      Introduce your child to basic beats and rhythms. You might like to use familiar words from nursery rhymes to start with.
  • ·      Use an empty kitchen roll as an alternative to a plastic cup

A guide to learning and development outcomes for your child

By doing this activity with me you will help me to develop my fine motor skills and grasping movements.  This activity will also help to develop my hand eye coordination.  This is called my physical development.

When you make a shaker with me you will help me to learn about sounds, beats and rhythms, colours and shapes.  You will also be helping me with my conversation skills.  This is called my intellectual development.

We can talk about colours and sounds together.  You will be helping me with my range of vocabulary and speech and language development.  Help me to learn words such as shake, rattle, swish, count.

Making a shaker will give me lots of enjoyment and a sense of achievement.

When you praise and encourage me, you will help to raise my self-esteem and build my confidence.  This is good for my emotional development.

By enjoying this activity with siblings, I will learn how to learn to share and take turns which will help me with my social development.

The sound that the shaker makes will help by helping me to understand different sounds.  Colours will stimulate my vision and the essences will introduce me to a range of new scents which will help my sensory development.

Child Safe Zones at Festival Place

Basingstoke Festival Place operates as a Child Safe Zone:

Around the country, shopping centres, beaches, visitor attractions and other family venues are becoming Child Safe Zones…

If you have children its very likely you have experienced that dreaded moment when you turn around and your child is out of sight… the Child Safe Zones scheme can help.

If you lose your child in a Child Safe Zone, simply ring the number clearly displayed on the Child Safe Zones stickers or posters for direct contact with the local security team – getting help with your search quickly. This simple, effective service works for everyone and is free.

You do not need to register with FamilySafePlus+ and you do not have to buy any Child Safe Accessories. Just call the number displayed.

Virtually every venue in the UK has a missing child procedure. The Child Safe Zone Scheme simply brings all these systems under one nationally recognised identity – helping venues and parents to keep children safe and found.

This scheme is can prove equally valuable for older children and vulnerable adults, where personal safety is an issue.

Free Wristbands

All Child Safe Zones offer free wristbands allowing children to carry their parent or guardian’s contact mobile number safely. Look out for the dispensers as you enter the Zone, and help Child Safe Zones to reunite your child with you quickly, if they lose sight of you.

Resource: http://www.childsafezones.co.uk/childsafe-zones.html#

Related Posts

Safety at Home

Recommendations for a First Aid Kit

Library Membership

Visit your local library or complete the Online Registration Form to join

  • If you live, work or study in Hampshire you can become a member – it’s free to join. You’re never too young – even babies can join!
  • If you have difficulty using the library we have specialist services which can help you.
  •  A wide selection of books, films, games and music for you to borrow. Try something new – libraries run courses and workshops from arts and crafts to employment preparation.
  •  Free internet and IT in every library and Discovery Centre. WiFi is available in several libraries so you can use your own devices too.
  • Access library resources from home – you can download ebooks and audiobooks and use our online reference collection.

Related Posts

Library Membership for your child

Bookstart

School catchment finder, Report on school admissions and Ofsted Reports in North Hampshire

Following on from the Education posts there are some very interesting links below (Thanks Su for forwarding them on!).  I don’t want to scare anyone but you may be intrigued to see where your little one falls in the catchment lottery for when they start Infants school  in North Hampshire and where they will be allotted for Junior’s and Senior schools:

School catchment finder

The report on School Admissions is a really interesting read, particularly at the end of the report where it is listed the number of children that have been accepted into the school and whether brothers and sisters have also been accepted:

Report on school admissions

If you have a little one starting nursery soon you may also find the following website useful as you should be able to check up on the Nursery’s latest Ofsted report. You can also find Infants, Juniors and Senior schools Ofsted reports from this linky:

Ofsted Early years and Childcare

Sorry if I’ve scared anyone but I hope you find the above useful. It would be great to hear your feedback…

Related Posts

Montessori Education

Home Schooling

Waldorf Steiner Education

Benefits and Entitlements for families

There is a wide range of financial help for families. Some is available to all, some only in special circumstances, and some only if your income is low.

From pregnancy through to your child reaching age 20, state help is available towards the cost of raising a family. Make sure you claim everything you are entitled to.

See the tables later on in this section for a quick guide to state help for families. You’ll find details of some of the key benefits in these other sections:

Most benefits and entitlements are not paid automatically and can be backdated only for a short period. Claim now so you don’t lose out.

http://www.moneyadviceservice.org.uk/parents/entitlements/benefits/default.aspx

Useful contacts

Call rates may vary – check with your telephone provider for their charges.

Parent’s guide to money calculators

Money Advice Service
moneyadviceservice.org.uk/parents

Child Benefit

HM Revenue & Customs
Tel:           0300 200 3100
www.hmrc.gov.uk/childbenefit

Child Tax Credit and Working Tax Credit

HM Revenue & Customs
Tel:             0345 300 3900
www.hmrc.gov.uk/taxcredits

Also see a previous Northhantsmum blog post on tax credits.

Healthy Start vitamins and vouchers

Your midwife or doctor
Tel:           0345 607 6823
www.healthystart.nhs.uk

Statutory Maternity and Paternity Pay

Your employer

Additional Paternity Leave and Pay

Directgov (Great Britain)
www.direct.gov.uk/dadsatwork

Maternity Allowance, Sure Start Maternity Grant, Income Support, Jobseeker’s Allowance, Widowed Parent’s Allowance

Jobcentre Plus (Great Britain)
See phone book
www.direct.gov.uk/jobseekers

Housing Benefit and Council Tax Benefit

Your local authority (Great Britain)
See phone book

Jobcentre Plus (Great Britain) if applying at same time as other benefits
See phone book
www.direct.gov.uk/jobseekers

Early education places

Family Information Service (Great Britain)
http://local.direct.gov.uk/LDGRedirect/index.jsp?LGSL=1579&LGIL=8&ServiceName=Find%20out%20about%20family%20information%20services

To find local childcare and nurseries (Great Britain)
Contact your local authority
http://www.familyandchildcaretrust.org/

School-related benefits

Your local education authority (Great Britain)

See phone book

Discretionary Support Fund

Next Step
Tel:             0800 100 900
www.direct.gov.uk/nextstep

Student services team at your college

Childcare Grant and Parents’ Learning Allowance

Student Finance England
Tel:             0845 300 5090
www.direct.gov.uk/studentfinance

For help claiming benefits

Citizens Advice Bureau (England, Wales and Northern Ireland)
See phone book
www.citizensadvice.org.uk (England and Wales)
www.citizensadvice.co.uk (Northern Ireland)

Community Legal Advice (England and Wales)
Tel:             0845 345 4345
www.legalservices.gov.uk/public/community_legal_advice.asp

Bookstart

Bookstart is a national programme that encourages parents and carers to enjoy books with children from as early an age as possible.

Bookstart gives the gift of free books to children at three stages in their early life, along with guidance materials for parents and carers.

The scheme enjoys sponsorship from around 25 children’s publishers, Red House Books and government funding via the Sure Start Unit.

Bookstart Book Crawls

For children aged 0 – 4 years old.
You will be given a collector’s card when you join the Book Crawl and a sticker for the card each time your child visits the library.
When your card is full your child will qualify for a Bookstart Book Crawl certificate, which may be presented at a special event.

Rhymetimes

Fun and free Rhymetimes for babies, toddlers and their parents or carers are organised in many libraries around the county.  They aim to encourage parents and carers to share action songs and rhymes with babies from birth onwards.

Home Schooling

Educating your child at home

Most parents send their child to school, but you do have the right to educate your child at home. As a parent, you must ensure your child receives a full-time education from the age of five.

What’s required of you

The facts about home education are:

  • you do not need to be a qualified teacher to educate your child at home
  • your child is not obliged to follow the National Curriculum or take national tests, but as a parent you are required by law to ensure your child receives full-time education suitable to their age, ability and aptitude
  • any special educational needs your child may have must be recognised
  • you do not need special permission from a school or local authority to educate your child at home, but you do need to notify the school in writing if you’re taking your child out of school
  • you will need to notify the local authority if you are removing your child from a special school
  • you do not need to observe school hours, days or terms
  • you do not need to have a fixed timetable, nor give formal lessons
  • there are no funds directly available from central government for parents who decide to educate their children at home
  • some local authorities provide guidance for parents, including free National Curriculum materials

The role of your local authority

Local authorities can make informal enquiries of parents who are educating their children at home to establish that a suitable education is being provided. If your local authority makes an informal enquiry, you can provide evidence your child is receiving an efficient and suitable education by:

  • writing a report
  • providing samples of your child’s work
  • inviting a local authority representative to your home, with or without your child being present
  • meeting a local authority representative outside the home, with or without your child being present (representatives have no automatic right of access to your home)

If it appears to the local authority that a child is not receiving a suitable education, then it might serve a school attendance order.

Although you’re not legally required to inform your local authority when you decide to educate your child at home, it is helpful if you do so. The only exception to this is where your child is attending a special school under arrangements made by the local authority. In this case additional permission is required from the authority before the child’s name can be removed from the register.

If you are taking your child out of school to home educate them, you need to inform the school in writing. It’s advisable, but not compulsory, to inform your local authority of any significant changes in your circumstance relevant to your child’s education, like a change of address.

Find out more about home educating

Many local authorities have information online about educating your child at home. The following link will let you enter details of where you live and then take you to the relevant page on your local authority’s website.

Taken from: http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/parents/schoolslearninganddevelopment/choosingaschool/dg_4016124

Further Reading

http://home-ed.info/

http://www.home-education.org.uk/

http://www.primaryhomeeducation.co.uk/

http://www.ahomeeducation.co.uk/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/homeschooling

http://www.oxfordhomeschooling.co.uk/

http://www.thegreenparent.co.uk/blog/post/he-what-to-read/

Waldorf Steiner Education in North Hampshire

There are no Steiner education schools in Basingstoke.

The nearest schools are listed below:

READING
Alder Bridge School * (1989)
EC-6 (70)
Bridge House, Mill Lane, Padworth, Berks. RG7 4JU
DfE: 869/6013
Tel 0118 971 4471
Fax 07092042631

info@alderbridge.w-berks.sch.uk

http://www.alderbridge.w-berks.sch.uk/

RINGWOOD
Ringwood Waldorf School (1974)
EC to 10 (270)
Folly Farm lane, Ashley, Ringwood, Hampshire BH24 2NN
DfE: 835/6022
Tel 01425 472664

mail@ringwoodwaldorfschool.org.uk

http://www.ringwoodwaldorfschool.org.uk/

Interest Groups (non-accredited by SWSF)

HAMPSHIRE
Wildflowers Kindergarten, Kilmeston Village Hall, Alresford Hants SO24 ONR
Enquiries: Brockwood Park School, Bramdean, Hants SO24 0LQ
Tel 01962 771458

helena@wildflowers-kindergartens.co.uk

http://www.wildflowers-kindergartens.co.uk/

What is Steiner education?

Steiner education…

  • Works for all children irrespective of academic ability, class, ethnicity or religion;
  • Takes account of the needs of the whole child – academic, physical, emotional and spiritual;
  • Is based on an understanding of the relevance of the different phases of child development;
  • Develops a love of learning and an enthusiasm for school;
  • Sees artistic activity and the development of the imagination as integral to learning;
  • Is tried and tested and is part of state funded, mainstream provision in most European countries;
  • Is respected worldwide for its ability to produce very able young people who have a strong sense of self and diverse capacities that enable them to become socially and economically responsible citizens.

Who was Rudolf Steiner?

Rudolf Steiner (1861 – 1925) was an innovative academic born in Austria whose ideas founded the basis of Anthroposophy.

He applied his ideas to education as well as agriculture, medicine, architecture and social reform. The Steiner Waldorf Schools Fellowship acknowledges Rudolf Steiner as the founding inspiration of modern day Steiner schools, but does not promote Anthroposophy or endorse every aspect of it.

For more details check out: http://www.steinerwaldorf.org/whatissteinereducation.html

Further Reading

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_education

http://www.guardian.co.uk/education/mortarboard/2008/nov/12/home-schooling-steiner

Related Pages

Education