Play Dough Recipes

Stretchy Dough 

  • 3lb self-raising flour
  • approx. 1 and a quarter pints of water

Mix together until dough is formed. Knead well.

Makes an elastic dough that the children will enjoy pulling and stretching.

Will not keep for any length of time though.

http://childmindinghelp.co.uk/freeresources/PSE/stretchydough.html

Giltter Play Dough

  • 1 cup flour
  • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup salt
  • 2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • Food coloring gel
  • Glitter

Mix all ingredients with the exception of the glitter in a sauce pan. Heat over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture forms a ball (sounds cryptic, but you will know when it happens). Remove from heat, but dough ball in a large bowl. Add the glitter and knead until smooth and uniform. Store in an airtight container at room temperature.

http://nanasfablife.blogspot.com/2011/07/lily-and-chloes-fabulous-life-glitter.html

Microwave Play Dough

Don’t want to cook your playdough on the stove? Use a microwave!

  • 1 cup of water
  • 1 cup of flour
  • 2 teaspoon of cream of tartar
  • 1 tablespoon of cooking oil
  • 1/2 cup of salt
  • Food coloring

Mix all of the ingredients, except for the food color. Microwave it for about one minute and stir. Cook for about 30 more seconds. Keep repeating until the playdough is dough-ish. Knead the playdough and place the food coloring in. Its that simple!

http://www.playdoughrecipe.com/microwave-playdough-recipe/

Cooked Play Dough

  • 2 cups of plain flour
  • 1 Tbsp. of cooking oil
  • 1 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 2 cups of coloured water
  • 1 cup of salt

Place all of the ingredients in a medium size or large pan. Cook slowly on medium-high and stir it until the playdough thickens. Keeps best in the fridge in plastic containers.
Takes less than 10 minutes.

http://www.playdoughrecipe.com/cooked-playdough-recipe/

Modelling Dough

There are many types of modelling dough that you can buy, but it is just as easy (and much cheaper) to make your  own.  Use food colourings for different colours and you can make it seasonal by adding glitter near Christmas (or to make fairy dough), smooth pebbles in summer etc just use your imagination!

Essential Oils
Used sparingly these make great additions to modelling dough  – a few drops of lavender can have a calming effect (and is antibacterial) and eucalyptus has a great menthol smell which is great for winter (not suitable for use around asthma sufferers).

  • 4 cups flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 4 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons oil
  • 1/2 cup cream of tartar

Mix all ingredients in a sauce pan. Cook and stir over low/medium heat until play dough is completely formed and no longer sticky. Allow to cool slightly before storing in an air tight container or bag.  Keep in the fridge.

Uncooked modelling dough

  • 1 cup cold water
  • 1 cup salt
  • 2 teaspoons vegetable oil
  • food coloring
  • 3 cups flour
  • 2 tablespoons cornflour

Put everything except the flour and cornflour into a bowl.  Gradually add these until you have the consistency of bread dough.  Store in an air tight container or bag in the fridge.

Salt dough

  • 1 cup salt
  • 1 cup water
  • 1/2 cup flour plus additional flour

Mix all ingredient together in a saucepan over a low heat.  Remove when rubbery.  Once cooled knead with flour to make it workable.  This is a great dough for making Christmas decorations and models out of.  Once made pop them on grease proof paper or a tray on a radiator (or in airing cupboard or bottom shelf of a rayburn) so that they dry very slowly. Once dryed they can be painted.

Fairy dough – just add glitter (great when you are getting festive too)

http://www.netmums.com/activities/arts-and-crafts/modelling-dough

Lily Pad’s Play Dough

  • 2 cups plain flour
  • 1 cup salt
  • 2 cups water
  • 2 tbsp cooking oil
  • 4 tsp cream tartar
  • Food colouring
  • To make smelly play dough, simply add an
  • essence (vanilla or peppermint).

Mix together ingredients in a sauce pan
Heat for a few minutes on the hob, stirringcontinuously
Remove from heat when the consistency is a doughy texture
Leave to cool before use

http://www3.hants.gov.uk/lily_pads_-_play_dough_download.pdf

Related Posts

Musical Shakers

Babies – Treasure Baskets

Musical Shakers

Miss NHM and I made a shaker at a baby PEEP class that we visited out in Kingsclere when Miss NHM was 7 months old.

We still have her shaker now, at 3 1/2 years old and she still plays with it!

What you will need

  • ·      1 plastic cup
  • ·      Dried rice or lentils
  • ·      Paper
  • ·      Sellotape
  • ·      Pens, stickers or paints to decorate

Steps to making a shaker

  • ·      Fill your chosen container with lentils or rice
  • ·      Cover the top of the cup with paper and secure with sellotape
  • ·      Decorate the shaker using a range  of pens and paints or other  decorative material

Tips for staying safe …

  • ·      Young children must be supervised at all times.
  • ·       Do not allow your child to ingest the rice or lentils (risk of choking)
  • ·       Do not use ceramic cups

Working together

  • ·      Enhance your child’s communication by asking what they are doing with each stage
  • ·      Ask your child about the colours and shapes they are using to decorate their shaker.
  • ·      Introduce your child to basic beats and rhythms. You might like to use familiar words from nursery rhymes to start with.
  • ·      Use an empty kitchen roll as an alternative to a plastic cup

A guide to learning and development outcomes for your child

By doing this activity with me you will help me to develop my fine motor skills and grasping movements.  This activity will also help to develop my hand eye coordination.  This is called my physical development.

When you make a shaker with me you will help me to learn about sounds, beats and rhythms, colours and shapes.  You will also be helping me with my conversation skills.  This is called my intellectual development.

We can talk about colours and sounds together.  You will be helping me with my range of vocabulary and speech and language development.  Help me to learn words such as shake, rattle, swish, count.

Making a shaker will give me lots of enjoyment and a sense of achievement.

When you praise and encourage me, you will help to raise my self-esteem and build my confidence.  This is good for my emotional development.

By enjoying this activity with siblings, I will learn how to learn to share and take turns which will help me with my social development.

The sound that the shaker makes will help by helping me to understand different sounds.  Colours will stimulate my vision and the essences will introduce me to a range of new scents which will help my sensory development.

All those Questions you’ve been dying to ask your Toddler…

1. What is something Mummy always says to you?

2. What makes Mummy happy?

3. What makes Mummy sad?

4. How does your mummy make you laugh?

5. What did your mummy like to do when she was little?

6. How old is your mummy?

7. How tall is your mummy?

8. What is her favorite thing to watch on TV?

9. What does your mummy do when you’re not there?

10. What is your mummy really good at?

11. What is your mummy not very good at?

12. What does your mummy do for her job?

13. What is your mummy’s favourite food?

14. What makes you proud of your mummy?

15. If your mummy were a cartoon character, who would she be?

16. What do you and your mummy do together?

17. How are you and your mummy the same?

18. How are you and your mummy different?

19. How do you know your mummy loves you?

20. What does your mummy like most about your daddy?

21. Where is your mummy’s favourite place to go?

22. What is one thing you wish you could change about your mummy?

23. What would your mummy do with a million pounds?

24. What do you wish you could go and do with your mummy?

25. What is one thing you hope never changes about your mummy?

Babies – Treasure Baskets

Treasure Baskets

A baby’s brain is growing fast, developing in response to her surroundings through the senses of touch, smell, taste, hearing, sight and movement. Babies are naturally curious about the world and the more experiences they are offered, where they can choose, the more those experiences will feed their curiosity.

The treasure basket is a collection of everyday objects chosen to stimulate the different senses. It is one way of giving babies a wide range of experiences that help the brain to make connections and develop – and helps to keep them happy! Babies learn from the treasure basket by looking, touching, sucking, licking, banging, picking up and dropping. It gives babies the chance to explore and decide for themselves what they wato to play with. Babies’ curiosity about the contents of teh treasure basket means that they will often concentrate for longer and longer periods of time.

We often forget that, until a baby can move independently, her choices are limited to what the people around her will give her to play with. Through repeated handling of a variety of objects, babies learn many abstract concepts to do with the physical qualities of objects, such as coldness, smoothness, heaviness and prickliness.

Making the treasure basket

  • A treasure basket should not tip over too easily
  • Fill the basket with objects, so that your baby has plenty to choose from
  • Babies often want to put everything into their mouths. Make sure that everything you choose for the basket is safe
  • Everyday items from around the home are best. The purpose is to offer interest through smell, taste, sound, touch and sight (e.g. from colour, form, length, shininess)

A basket could contain

  • Natural objects – fir cones, big shells, large walnuts, pumice stone, fruit: apple, lemon
  • Objects made from natural material – woollen ball, little baskets, brushes (test bristles are firmly attached)
  • Wood – rattles, spoons, egg cups, bowls, pegs, napkin rings
  • Metal – spoons, tin lids, tea strainer, garlic squeezer, bunch of keys
  • Odds and ends – little notebooks, small purses, small cardboard boxes, inside of kitchen roles

Using the treasure basket

  • Sit nearby and watch to give your baby confidence. There is no need to talk or intervene unless your baby clearly needs attention.
    Make sure that your baby is seated comfortably and safely, with cushions for support if necessary
  • Check the contents of the basket regularly, cleaning objects and removing any damaged items
  • It helps to change some of the items in the treasure basket from time to time
  • Try not to take charge and hand baby objects as this can sometimes be overwhelming for the baby

If you have an older child try providing a distraction for them to play with so your baby can explore at their own pace.

Taken from: http://www.peeple.org.uk/node/152