All those Questions you’ve been dying to ask your Toddler…

1. What is something Mummy always says to you?

2. What makes Mummy happy?

3. What makes Mummy sad?

4. How does your mummy make you laugh?

5. What did your mummy like to do when she was little?

6. How old is your mummy?

7. How tall is your mummy?

8. What is her favorite thing to watch on TV?

9. What does your mummy do when you’re not there?

10. What is your mummy really good at?

11. What is your mummy not very good at?

12. What does your mummy do for her job?

13. What is your mummy’s favourite food?

14. What makes you proud of your mummy?

15. If your mummy were a cartoon character, who would she be?

16. What do you and your mummy do together?

17. How are you and your mummy the same?

18. How are you and your mummy different?

19. How do you know your mummy loves you?

20. What does your mummy like most about your daddy?

21. Where is your mummy’s favourite place to go?

22. What is one thing you wish you could change about your mummy?

23. What would your mummy do with a million pounds?

24. What do you wish you could go and do with your mummy?

25. What is one thing you hope never changes about your mummy?

Parenting Websites

The list below is some of the most popular parenting websites in the UK. Several of them offer freebies when you join and all of them provide a lot of useful information. If you feel that there are other useful parenting websites that are missing, please add them in a comment below.

Babies – Treasure Baskets

Treasure Baskets

A baby’s brain is growing fast, developing in response to her surroundings through the senses of touch, smell, taste, hearing, sight and movement. Babies are naturally curious about the world and the more experiences they are offered, where they can choose, the more those experiences will feed their curiosity.

The treasure basket is a collection of everyday objects chosen to stimulate the different senses. It is one way of giving babies a wide range of experiences that help the brain to make connections and develop – and helps to keep them happy! Babies learn from the treasure basket by looking, touching, sucking, licking, banging, picking up and dropping. It gives babies the chance to explore and decide for themselves what they wato to play with. Babies’ curiosity about the contents of teh treasure basket means that they will often concentrate for longer and longer periods of time.

We often forget that, until a baby can move independently, her choices are limited to what the people around her will give her to play with. Through repeated handling of a variety of objects, babies learn many abstract concepts to do with the physical qualities of objects, such as coldness, smoothness, heaviness and prickliness.

Making the treasure basket

  • A treasure basket should not tip over too easily
  • Fill the basket with objects, so that your baby has plenty to choose from
  • Babies often want to put everything into their mouths. Make sure that everything you choose for the basket is safe
  • Everyday items from around the home are best. The purpose is to offer interest through smell, taste, sound, touch and sight (e.g. from colour, form, length, shininess)

A basket could contain

  • Natural objects – fir cones, big shells, large walnuts, pumice stone, fruit: apple, lemon
  • Objects made from natural material – woollen ball, little baskets, brushes (test bristles are firmly attached)
  • Wood – rattles, spoons, egg cups, bowls, pegs, napkin rings
  • Metal – spoons, tin lids, tea strainer, garlic squeezer, bunch of keys
  • Odds and ends – little notebooks, small purses, small cardboard boxes, inside of kitchen roles

Using the treasure basket

  • Sit nearby and watch to give your baby confidence. There is no need to talk or intervene unless your baby clearly needs attention.
    Make sure that your baby is seated comfortably and safely, with cushions for support if necessary
  • Check the contents of the basket regularly, cleaning objects and removing any damaged items
  • It helps to change some of the items in the treasure basket from time to time
  • Try not to take charge and hand baby objects as this can sometimes be overwhelming for the baby

If you have an older child try providing a distraction for them to play with so your baby can explore at their own pace.

Taken from: http://www.peeple.org.uk/node/152

Traveling with your baby – Part 2

Changing

If your bag doesn’t have a compact changing mat, buy a travel version or disposable ones. . If you’re going to Europe, nappy sizes are the same as in the UK, so you shouldn’t have trouble finding suitable ones.

Bathtime

There’s no need to take all your equipment away with you – a favourite toy and a fold-away or inflatable baby bath will do the job. It’s wise to pack baby-friendly toiletries as you may not be able to find the ones you normally use. If a bath is part of your bedtime routine, try to stick to it – but don’t worry if things change while you’re away, just enjoy it. Your little one will soon slot back into her normal routine once you’re home.

Bedtime

A travel cost is a must for overnight stays. All models fold down for storage and come with a carry case and handle. Many hotels and holiday cottages provide cots, so check before you go. Baby sleeping bags save on bedding and are ideal for travel. They’re available in a range of weights, so buy a light one if your going somewhere warm. And think about packing a portable safety gate if you’re staying in a holiday house or cottage.

Useful tips for trouble-free travel

  • Pack twice the amount of clothes you think your baby will need – to cope with any leaks or travel sickness.
  • If you’re going on a long motorway journey, try to plan to travel at your baby’s nap time and allow for feeding stops.
  • Allow longer for your journey and build unscheduled stops into your itinerary. Make sure you’ve got time to cope with any additional feeds and nappy changes.
  • If your baby has a comforter or uses a soother, take it with you and pack a spare one in case you lose it en route!
  • You don’t need to take all the toys you use to entertain your baby at home. When you’re on holiday, she’ll be stimulated by the change of scene, pace and family all being together.

Traveling with your baby – Part 1

Travel Medicine Cabinet

When you travel with your little one it’s best to travel with a few medical essentials, especially if you’re heading overseas. Don’t leave home without:
  • Your baby’s red book – essential if you have to call a doctor or take your baby to hospital
  • Liquid paracetamol such as calpol. Calpol do sachets which you can buy from Boots.
  • Teething gel, such as calgel
  • Thermometer
  • antiseptic wipes – ideal for cuts and for quickly sanitising a changing mat
  • Antiseptic barrier cream such as sudocrem – soothes everything from nappy rash, insect bites to eczema and heat rash. Bounty’s free family packs have trial pots which are perfect for traveling with

Bottlefeeding

If you’re going abroad, take enough formula for the duration of your trip (you can’t guarantee you’ll be able to buy the one you use). For the journey, take ready-mixed cartons of formula. If you’re flying, check the restrictions on carrying baby forumla/liquids in the Air Travel Section of www.direct.gov.uk. If you don’t have a travel steriliser, you can get microwave of cold water ones.

  • Mothercare microwave and cold water steriliser – £4.99
  • Mothercare travel bottle and food warmer – £9.99
  • Tommee Tippee single bottle microwave and cold water steriliser £9.99

Travel

From around three to six months your baby can recline in a lightweight stroller that folds down more compactly than a traditional pushchair.  A large basket is handy for travel, too. For short hops and city breaks, you may find a baby carrier or sling useful, leaving your hands-free.

You’ll need for traveling – Babies 0-6 months

  • A travel cot
  • Sleeping bag or sheets and blankets
  • baby monitor may be useful
  • pushchair, parasol and raincover
  • baby carrier/sling
  • sun blinds
  • travel changing mat – pampers do disposable changing mat’s – not very ethically minded but very helpful!
  • plenty of clothes
  • travel toys
  • enough nappies and wipes for a few days
  • breast pump, if expressing
  • travel steriliser, bottles, formula and insulated bottle bag (if bottlefeeding)
  • medical essentials (see above)
  • travel wash
 

What is Baby Led Weaning?

Baby Led Weaning (BLW) means letting your baby feed themselves (also known as self-feed) from the start by offering foods that your baby can manage – mainly finger foods. There’s no need for baby food, purees or baby rice. If you want to try:

  • Start of with pieces of everyday food that fit their hand – a largish chip-size piece is a good shape to grip
  • For first foods, steam carrots or sweet potato, cut up broccoli or cauliflower, make toast fingers or cut bits of banana
  • With BLW forget about the idea of three meals – it’s not about amount, it’s about taste
  • If your baby gags, don’t panic, it’s simply a baby’s natural reflex to stop them from choking on food they can’t swallow